After Math of the War

Seminole County, Oklahoma

Seminole County, Oklahoma

Seminole, Florida

Seminole, Florida

Miccosukee, Florida

Miccosukee, Florida

The Second Seminole War in total lasted almost seven years, from December 23 of 1835 to August 14 of 1842.

As far as casualties, around 1600 US troops lost their lives, and while the total of Seminole Warriors killed is unknown for sure, it is said that their numbers were exponentially diminished. The cost of the war for the US was around $30 million, which was also more than the annual federal budget.

Around 3,000 Seminoles moved West at the end of the war, but some were able to remain in Florida. The Seminoles saw this as a win and is seen as a win by some historians as well. The Seminoles were the only group of Indians who fought removal and were able to stay on their original lands. 

Though they "won" the Second Seminole War, that didn't stop the coming of the Third Seminole War. This war would last from 1855-1858, and was once again a fight over land. It is also known as the Billy Bowlegs' War, as a man named Billy Bowlegs led the Seminoles during this war. Bowlegs ended up emigrating with other Seminoles, but again, other Seminoles remained in Florida. 

Today, there is a town in Florida named Seminole. There is still a tribe council that carries its own type of government. Many tribe members have "luxuries" such as homes and jobs, but they still practice the ways of the tribe. 

The rough total population of Seminoles left is about 23,000. This is divided between three separate federally recognized groups of indians: the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida. A vast majority, around 19,000, of these Seminoles belong to the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma. 

After Math of the War