Where Feminism Went

The Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 was the success that it was thanks to the composure and leadership by Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.³ These two ladies paved the way for feminsim and made it possible for women to hold future conventions without fearing protestors. Not only did the first women's convention in 1848 generate more acceptance for the idea that women deserved more rights, but it also can be credited as the event that officially launced the movement for women's suffrage in America.¹⁰ The Seneca Falls Convention inspired a nation of women to demand equality in a confident way, something that America had never seen before.

Even so many years later, Seneca Falls symbolizes a place of women empowerment and the place where American feminism was truly launched into action.¹⁰ Without the bravery and initiative taken by the women abolitionists at Seneca Falls in 1848, women would likely not enjoy many of the freedoms that we do today, or at least would not have earned these freedoms as quickly. Many things that are taken for granted on a daily basis such as the yearly Women's Marches, the right of women to vote, and women being allowed to participate and hold officer positions in societies that were traditionally exclusive to men are direct results of Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton's empowering and motivating 1848 convention.

Where Feminism Went