The United States' Ideologies and Views about Latin America

The Monroe Doctrine was a central document in examining America’s ideologies and views towards other nations. Americans believed that they were exceptional and God’s chosen people. Americans prided themselves on new and unique ideas that other nations did not. They believed that they were exceptional to other people and nations. They believed in liberating ideas such as freedom, equality, liberty, and justice for all. The Monroe Doctrine reflected and enabled this view through serval approaches. These concepts were unheard of at this time. They believed that it was their destiny to expand their territory and spread their beliefs across the world. The United States viewed Latin America as a savage place that needed saving. Americans believed that they were helping people. However, in certain cases they were doing more harm than good. The Monroe Doctrine made expansion more accessible through the way the United States viewed Latin American countries. Intervening in Latin America was a way in which the nation fulfilled their ideological goal of spreading American exceptionalism concepts.

The Mexican-American war was a conflict that was sparked by the idea of Manifest Destiny. The war was fought because gaining more western territory was an American interest that was based off of the belief that the United States was meant to expand its borders. If James K. Polk and the entire nation did not have faith in Manifest Destiny and expansionism, the United States would not have fought the brutal war in order to gain Mexican territory.

The United States viewed itself as the sole power in the Western Hemisphere. This became very clear with the support of Cuba when it began to pursue independence from Spain. The United States laid down a set of demands that would allow Cuba more antinomy, but the Spanish were not willing to accept this, so the United States began to look for other ways. With the sinking of the USS Maine, the United States had all the pretense it needed to go to war with Spain and gain Cuba.

The Monroe Doctrine affected relations between Gran Columbia and The United States in a very positive way.  America gained better trade conections and Columbia gained favorable realtions with the new world's most powerful nation. Shortly after Colombia's independence from Spain in 1819, The United States reached out to create diplomatic relations with the country. The Anderson-Gual Treaty of 1824 between the two countries was a bilateral trade treaty that made each country get a most favored nation status with each other. This was the first time that the United States had diplomatic relations with another American nation. After Gran Columbia collapsed in 1831, it was succeeded by the republic of New Grenada, and the United States continued relations with them. The Mallarino-Bidlack Treaty of 1846 renewed many of the friendly provisions from the 1824 accords, allowing merchants and other civilian ships to travel unharmed. It also included giving the United States many rights over the Panamanian isthmus region.10 This let America have the right to transportation in this area, granting them easier access to the Pacific Ocean. This area was soon to be more important than ever, due to the discovery of gold on the West Coast of California.

 

The United States' Ideologies and Views about Latin America