The art of poetry on a new plan

Full title:

"The art of poetry on a new plan illustrated with a great variety of examples from the best English poets; and of translations from the ancients: together with such reflections and critical remarks as may tend to form in our youth an elegant taste, and render the study of this part of the belles lettres more rational and pleasing."

Date of publication:

1762

Publisher:

J. Newbery

Place of publication:

London, at the Bible and Sun in St. Paul's Church-yard.

Physical description 

Content description

Both volumes exist as eighteenth-century sources for the study of English literature—poetry, specifically. The intended audience is younger. It is an "educational text." This is perhaps the reason it is well-worn (from consistent reference) and smaller (so it can be carried around).

Binding

Gold trim around the edges. Mostly plain, non-decorative. Binding is well-worn on both volumes indicating the book was used often--perhaps vigorously. Parts of the edges of the boards are chipped off. There are stains on the front and back boards. There is discoloration. 

Heraldry

John Newbery (1713-1767)

He was called "the Father of Children's Literature." Made printing children's literature sustainable and profitable; he was also a patron of Oliver Goldsmith. 

Oliver Goldsmith (1730-1774)

Anglo-Irish essayist, poet, and playwright. 

Significance?

Newbery helped establish a market for children's literature in bookselling. 'The art of poetry' reflects changing attitudes about children and education in the eighteenth century. Why were these attitudes changing? Some attribute it to the rise of the British middle-class -- they had more money and time to spend on their children. 

Other provenance notes

The art of poetry on a new plan: illustrated with a great variety of examples from the best English poets; and of translations from the ancients: together with such reflections and critical remarks as may tend to form in our youth an elegant taste, and render the study of this part of the belles lettres more rational and pleasing.


- Library of the University of Illinois” stamped


The art of poetry on a new plan: illustrated with a great variety of examples from the best English poets; and of translations from the ancients: together with such reflections and critical remarks as may tend to form in our youth an elegant taste, and render the study of this part of the belles lettres more rational and pleasing.

- Blue library code printed in both volumes

- What seems like grease stains are splattered throughout both volumes—bleeding through the pages.

The art of poetry on a new plan: illustrated with a great variety of examples from the best English poets; and of translations from the ancients: together with such reflections and critical remarks as may tend to form in our youth an elegant taste, and render the study of this part of the belles lettres more rational and pleasing.

- Ink stains on 106-107 of volume 1 — they appear a few other pages to a lesser extent, too. 

The art of poetry on a new plan: illustrated with a great variety of examples from the best English poets; and of translations from the ancients: together with such reflections and critical remarks as may tend to form in our youth an elegant taste, and render the study of this part of the belles lettres more rational and pleasing.

- There is a portion of the page that seemingly burned off/was spilled.

The art of poetry on a new plan