Malcolm's Homes

Malcolm moved around the Lansing area several times during his younger years in Michigan. His first home, purchased by his father Earl in 1928, was in a white neighborhood. It was burned to the ground by the Black Legion, a white supremacist group, about a year later. The family moved Charles Street, but left soon afterward because of the harsh segregation scene. Earl Little built the family’s third home in South Lansing, where they lived together through Earl’s death in 1931 and Louise’s departure to the Kalamazoo state mental hospital in 1939. Subsequently, Malcolm started moving through foster homes; in 1941 he left Michigan for Boston.

Malcolm’s experiences with white supremacist groups and racist social workers disrupting his family and home life help form his ideology of separatism and Black Nationalism. Being one of the only African Americans in his schools and foster homes made him realize to what degree racism was ingrained in the Lansing area population; his work for racial equality later in life reflects his childhood experiences facing segregation.

Malcolm's First Lansing House

The Little family moved in to the subdivision of Westmont, Lansing Michigan in 1928 hoping to escape the harassment they were experiencing. Their Westmont home was located in a predominantly white neighborhood. Unfortunately racism followed the…

Charles St. 2nd house

Malcolm X’s family left the Westmont subdivision of Lansing not only because the court declared that only whites could live there, but the house was also burned down (Seeking Michigan: Malcolm X in Michigan). So Malcolm X’s family moved to Charles…

Malcolm's Third Lansing Home

 Malcolm X moved to 4705 Logan Street (now Martin Luther King Boulevard) in 1930. Malcolm’s father, Earl Little, built the house for his family when they got tired of the racial segregation of East Lansing, and it was the Little family’s third house…

Gohanna's House

The strain of single-handedly providing for a family during the Great Depression was too much for Malcolm’s mother, Louise. Mentally, she could not handle the pressure of raising a black family in a predominately white community in the 30s, so she…

The Swerlins and Michigan State Detention Home

Malcolm X was sent to a Detention Home in 1939, in Mason, Michigan after he was expelled from his middle school, West Junior High School, because he put a thumbtack on his teacher’s chair. The detention home was run by a couple, Mr. and Mrs. Swerlin.…

Lyons' Home

In 1940, Malcolm left the Swerlin's State Detention Home to live with the Lyons family, who had children attending Mason High School with Malcolm. The Lyons were the only African American family in Mason, and Mr. Lyons was very respected. Living…